Knowledge, attitudes and sexual health behaviour of residents attending a nurse-led contraception & sexual health service within hostels for the homeless.
ESC Congress Library. SHAWE J. 05/28/14; 50501; A-086
Dr. JILL SHAWE
Dr. JILL SHAWE
Login now to access Regular content available to all registered users.

You may also access this content "anytime, anywhere" with the Free MULTILEARNING App for iOS and Android
Abstract
Rate & Comment (0)

Objective


The project aimed to establish and evaluate a Nurse-led Contraception & Sexual Health Service providing care within hostels for the homeless in London.   Homelessness is a risk factor for poor health and particularly sexual ill-health. Homeless women are more likely to become pregnant and to have had a sexually transmitted infection.  They often use drugs and alcohol and then need to sell sex to feed the habit.  Little is known about the sexual health of homeless men.


Design and Methods


A nurse-led outreach sexual health service was established once a week in three hostels for the homeless. Contraception and sexual health promotion, screening and treatment were offered by the Specialist Reproductive Health nurses, health care workers and health promotion staff.


 


Following consultations clients were asked to complete a questionnaire.   Questionnaires were also given out at three hostels without a service.  Interviews with residents (n=12) and staff (n=6) from the three hostels with the service and three hostels without a service explored knowledge, attitudes and sexual health behaviour.  Quantitative data was analysed using IBM SPSS v20 and Qualitative data using NVivo 10 software.


 


Results


161 clients (87 women and 71 men 3 unknown) used the service with 367 attendances. 42 completed questionnaires at hostels with a service and 28 at hostels without a service.  Poor general health including long term conditions, mental health conditions, addiction and substance misuse was reported. Harrowing stories of past trauma, abuse and sex work emerged from the interviews.  Key themes which made the hostel service attractive included issues with access to mainstream services, clients’ unwillingness to travel and needing support to attend.  Ensured confidentiality was another important factor in attendance.  Clients also suggested incentivising vaccination programmes.  Staff were positive about the service in the hostels and highlighted the need for more joined up working due to clients complex health needs.


Conclusion


The service has demonstrated unmet need and an impact on men and women who would not normally attend mainstream services.   It has also provided a valuable opportunity for health promotion both with residents and staff.


UK Department of Health policy suggests that homeless people require targeted, specialist services.  The service enables women & men at high risk of sexual ill-health to access appropriate care within a familiar non-threatening environment.

Objective


The project aimed to establish and evaluate a Nurse-led Contraception & Sexual Health Service providing care within hostels for the homeless in London.   Homelessness is a risk factor for poor health and particularly sexual ill-health. Homeless women are more likely to become pregnant and to have had a sexually transmitted infection.  They often use drugs and alcohol and then need to sell sex to feed the habit.  Little is known about the sexual health of homeless men.


Design and Methods


A nurse-led outreach sexual health service was established once a week in three hostels for the homeless. Contraception and sexual health promotion, screening and treatment were offered by the Specialist Reproductive Health nurses, health care workers and health promotion staff.


 


Following consultations clients were asked to complete a questionnaire.   Questionnaires were also given out at three hostels without a service.  Interviews with residents (n=12) and staff (n=6) from the three hostels with the service and three hostels without a service explored knowledge, attitudes and sexual health behaviour.  Quantitative data was analysed using IBM SPSS v20 and Qualitative data using NVivo 10 software.


 


Results


161 clients (87 women and 71 men 3 unknown) used the service with 367 attendances. 42 completed questionnaires at hostels with a service and 28 at hostels without a service.  Poor general health including long term conditions, mental health conditions, addiction and substance misuse was reported. Harrowing stories of past trauma, abuse and sex work emerged from the interviews.  Key themes which made the hostel service attractive included issues with access to mainstream services, clients’ unwillingness to travel and needing support to attend.  Ensured confidentiality was another important factor in attendance.  Clients also suggested incentivising vaccination programmes.  Staff were positive about the service in the hostels and highlighted the need for more joined up working due to clients complex health needs.


Conclusion


The service has demonstrated unmet need and an impact on men and women who would not normally attend mainstream services.   It has also provided a valuable opportunity for health promotion both with residents and staff.


UK Department of Health policy suggests that homeless people require targeted, specialist services.  The service enables women & men at high risk of sexual ill-health to access appropriate care within a familiar non-threatening environment.

    This eLearning portal is powered by:
    This eLearning portal is powered by MULTIEPORTAL
Anonymous User Privacy Preferences

Strictly Necessary Cookies (Always Active)

MULTILEARNING platforms and tools hereinafter referred as “MLG SOFTWARE” are provided to you as pure educational platforms/services requiring cookies to operate. In the case of the MLG SOFTWARE, cookies are essential for the Platform to function properly for the provision of education. If these cookies are disabled, a large subset of the functionality provided by the Platform will either be unavailable or cease to work as expected. The MLG SOFTWARE do not capture non-essential activities such as menu items and listings you click on or pages viewed.


Performance Cookies

Performance cookies are used to analyse how visitors use a website in order to provide a better user experience.


Save Settings