Use of Sexual and Reproductive Health Services and Associated Factors among Immigrants in Portugal
ESC Congress Library. Dias S. 05/28/14; 50524; A-109
Prof. Sonia Dias
Prof. Sonia Dias
Login now to access Regular content available to all registered users.

You may also access this content "anytime, anywhere" with the Free MULTILEARNING App for iOS and Android
Abstract
Rate & Comment (0)

Objectives: This study aimed to describe the use of SRH services among immigrants in Portugal and identify associated factors.
Method: A participatory cross-sectional study was conducted with 1187 immigrants (52.2% women; 34.0% from Portuguese-speaking African countries, 33.8% Brazil, 32.3% Eastern Europe) living in the Lisbon Metropolitan Area. Participants were selected through snowball sampling. Data was collected through a questionnaire applied by trained interviewers in governmental and non-governmental organizations. The instrument included items on socio-demographics and SRH services use. A logistic regression analysis was performed. The magnitude of the associations was estimated by means of OR with 95% CI.
Results: Overall, 25.1% of participants reported having had a SRH consultation, more women (36.7% vs. 12.4% of men) (p<0.001); no significant differences were found across origin. About 38% had no children. More Brazilians reported having no children, Eastern Europeans having 1-2 and Africans having >2 (p<0.001). Having children was positively associated with having had a SRH consultation (p=0.002). Approximately 62% reported having ever been tested for HIV, more frequently women (p<0.001) and Brazilians (p<0.001). In the last SRH consultation, 53.1% had family planning, 44.0% had routine exams, 19.2% obtained SRH information and 9.9% had an HIV test. About 90% reported having been satisfied. Overall, 4.3% of participants reported having had an STI in the last 12 months, more frequently Africans (6.1%) than Brazilians (4.0%) and Eastern Europeans (2.8%) (p=0.072). Among those, 56% reported haven't attended a SRH consultation. Among women, having had a SRH consultation was more likely among those younger (OR=0.96, 95%CI=0.95-0.98) and with higher length of stay in Portugal (OR=1.03, 95%CI=1.01-1.06). Among men, having had a SRH consultation was less likely among Africans (OR=0.28, 95%CI=0.13-0.59) and Brazilians (OR=0.31, 95%CI=0.16-0.61) compared to Eastern Europeans. Among both gender groups, HIV testing was positively associated with having had a SRH consultation (women: OR=1.76, 95%CI=1.18-2.63; men: OR=3.19, 95%CI=1.73-5.87). No significant association was found with immigration status.
Conclusions: The low proportion of immigrants attending a SRH consultation highlight the need of promoting SRH services use among this population addressing its specific needs. Cultural aspects should be disentangled as they appear to influence SRH services use, particularly among men. The fact that having a SRH consultation was independent of immigration status may be reflection of the current Portuguese legislation establishing universal access to healthcare. Integrated SRH and HIV health services entail opportunities for SRH promotion.

Objectives: This study aimed to describe the use of SRH services among immigrants in Portugal and identify associated factors.
Method: A participatory cross-sectional study was conducted with 1187 immigrants (52.2% women; 34.0% from Portuguese-speaking African countries, 33.8% Brazil, 32.3% Eastern Europe) living in the Lisbon Metropolitan Area. Participants were selected through snowball sampling. Data was collected through a questionnaire applied by trained interviewers in governmental and non-governmental organizations. The instrument included items on socio-demographics and SRH services use. A logistic regression analysis was performed. The magnitude of the associations was estimated by means of OR with 95% CI.
Results: Overall, 25.1% of participants reported having had a SRH consultation, more women (36.7% vs. 12.4% of men) (p<0.001); no significant differences were found across origin. About 38% had no children. More Brazilians reported having no children, Eastern Europeans having 1-2 and Africans having >2 (p<0.001). Having children was positively associated with having had a SRH consultation (p=0.002). Approximately 62% reported having ever been tested for HIV, more frequently women (p<0.001) and Brazilians (p<0.001). In the last SRH consultation, 53.1% had family planning, 44.0% had routine exams, 19.2% obtained SRH information and 9.9% had an HIV test. About 90% reported having been satisfied. Overall, 4.3% of participants reported having had an STI in the last 12 months, more frequently Africans (6.1%) than Brazilians (4.0%) and Eastern Europeans (2.8%) (p=0.072). Among those, 56% reported haven't attended a SRH consultation. Among women, having had a SRH consultation was more likely among those younger (OR=0.96, 95%CI=0.95-0.98) and with higher length of stay in Portugal (OR=1.03, 95%CI=1.01-1.06). Among men, having had a SRH consultation was less likely among Africans (OR=0.28, 95%CI=0.13-0.59) and Brazilians (OR=0.31, 95%CI=0.16-0.61) compared to Eastern Europeans. Among both gender groups, HIV testing was positively associated with having had a SRH consultation (women: OR=1.76, 95%CI=1.18-2.63; men: OR=3.19, 95%CI=1.73-5.87). No significant association was found with immigration status.
Conclusions: The low proportion of immigrants attending a SRH consultation highlight the need of promoting SRH services use among this population addressing its specific needs. Cultural aspects should be disentangled as they appear to influence SRH services use, particularly among men. The fact that having a SRH consultation was independent of immigration status may be reflection of the current Portuguese legislation establishing universal access to healthcare. Integrated SRH and HIV health services entail opportunities for SRH promotion.

    This eLearning portal is powered by:
    This eLearning portal is powered by MULTIEPORTAL
Anonymous User Privacy Preferences

Strictly Necessary Cookies (Always Active)

MULTILEARNING platforms and tools hereinafter referred as “MLG SOFTWARE” are provided to you as pure educational platforms/services requiring cookies to operate. In the case of the MLG SOFTWARE, cookies are essential for the Platform to function properly for the provision of education. If these cookies are disabled, a large subset of the functionality provided by the Platform will either be unavailable or cease to work as expected. The MLG SOFTWARE do not capture non-essential activities such as menu items and listings you click on or pages viewed.


Performance Cookies

Performance cookies are used to analyse how visitors use a website in order to provide a better user experience.


Save Settings