IUD strings: A comparison of male partners' reactions to different IUDs.
ESC Congress Library. Wiebe E. 05/28/14; 50563; A-148 Disclosure(s): No financial disclosures. Contrel supplied me with information and some of the devices used.
Ellen Wiebe
Ellen Wiebe
Login now to access Regular content available to all registered users.

You may also access this content "anytime, anywhere" with the Free MULTILEARNING App for iOS and Android
Abstract
Rate & Comment (0)

 OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to compare the male partners' reactions to the IUD strings of three types of IUDs: LNG-IUS, copper T IUDS and frameless IUDs. Anecdotally, we frequently needed to address this problem in our clinic during follow-up visits, but could not find any evidence in the medical literature.


METHODS: This was a retrospective chart review of women who had IUDs inserted in one clinic and included women in a clinical trial of frameless copper IUDs plus other women that had IUDs inserted during the same timeframe of April to August of 2013. At a follow-up visit 6-8 weeks post-insertion, women were asked if their partners noticed or were bothered by the IUD strings. We compared the answers for the three different types of IUDs.


RESULTS: There were 390 women who had had sex after the insertion, before the follow-up visit and provided data about their partners' reaction to the strings. Of these, 103 had LNG-IUS, 99 had copper T IUDs, and 288 had frameless copper IUDs. There were 46 women (11.8%) who said their partners were bothered by the strings and 53 women (13.4%) who said their partners noticed the strings but were not bothered. There was a significant difference between the three types of IUDs; there were no string complaints  from partners of  93 women with LNG-IUS (90.3%), 92 women with copper T IUDs (92.9%) and 106 women with frameless copper IUDs (56.4%)(p<.001). The five doctors in our clinic managed these string complaints with reassurance that it would improve with time (62.6%), shortening the string (30.3%) or tucking the string up inside the cervix (7.1%).


CONCLUSIONS: In this sample, 11.8% of the women said that their partners complained of the IUD strings bothering them during sex. This was more likely with frameless copper IUDs than with LNG-IUS or copper T IUDs. It is likely that the stiffer string of the frameless copper IUD is causing this problem. Clinicians must be aware of how to manage the strings, including tucking them into the cervix.

 OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to compare the male partners' reactions to the IUD strings of three types of IUDs: LNG-IUS, copper T IUDS and frameless IUDs. Anecdotally, we frequently needed to address this problem in our clinic during follow-up visits, but could not find any evidence in the medical literature.


METHODS: This was a retrospective chart review of women who had IUDs inserted in one clinic and included women in a clinical trial of frameless copper IUDs plus other women that had IUDs inserted during the same timeframe of April to August of 2013. At a follow-up visit 6-8 weeks post-insertion, women were asked if their partners noticed or were bothered by the IUD strings. We compared the answers for the three different types of IUDs.


RESULTS: There were 390 women who had had sex after the insertion, before the follow-up visit and provided data about their partners' reaction to the strings. Of these, 103 had LNG-IUS, 99 had copper T IUDs, and 288 had frameless copper IUDs. There were 46 women (11.8%) who said their partners were bothered by the strings and 53 women (13.4%) who said their partners noticed the strings but were not bothered. There was a significant difference between the three types of IUDs; there were no string complaints  from partners of  93 women with LNG-IUS (90.3%), 92 women with copper T IUDs (92.9%) and 106 women with frameless copper IUDs (56.4%)(p<.001). The five doctors in our clinic managed these string complaints with reassurance that it would improve with time (62.6%), shortening the string (30.3%) or tucking the string up inside the cervix (7.1%).


CONCLUSIONS: In this sample, 11.8% of the women said that their partners complained of the IUD strings bothering them during sex. This was more likely with frameless copper IUDs than with LNG-IUS or copper T IUDs. It is likely that the stiffer string of the frameless copper IUD is causing this problem. Clinicians must be aware of how to manage the strings, including tucking them into the cervix.

    This eLearning portal is powered by:
    This eLearning portal is powered by MULTIEPORTAL
Anonymous User Privacy Preferences

Strictly Necessary Cookies (Always Active)

MULTILEARNING platforms and tools hereinafter referred as “MLG SOFTWARE” are provided to you as pure educational platforms/services requiring cookies to operate. In the case of the MLG SOFTWARE, cookies are essential for the Platform to function properly for the provision of education. If these cookies are disabled, a large subset of the functionality provided by the Platform will either be unavailable or cease to work as expected. The MLG SOFTWARE do not capture non-essential activities such as menu items and listings you click on or pages viewed.


Performance Cookies

Performance cookies are used to analyse how visitors use a website in order to provide a better user experience.


Save Settings