Outcomes of Intrauterine Device Insertion Training for General Practitioners
ESC Congress Library. Bateson D. 05/28/14; 50564; A-149 Disclosure(s): Some authors have received honorariums for presenting on Long Acting reversible contraception from pharmaceutical companies, including Bayer, MSD
Assoc. Prof. Deborah Bateson
Assoc. Prof. Deborah Bateson
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Abstract
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Objective: The purpose of this study was to investigate the confidence and experience of Australian GPs in IUC insertion 12 months after completing an IUC training program at Family Planning, currently the main provider of IUC insertion training in Australia.
                                                                         
Design & Methods:The IUC training process consists of a home-based learning package, including written and video materials and activities to be submitted; a three-hour workshop with a simulation session using models and IUC training devices; followed by individual clinical training with 6-10 IUC insertions under direct supervision. All doctors who undertook IUC insertion training from January to December 2012, all working in general practice, were invited to participate in the study. Participants were sent a follow-up questionnaire 12 months after completing training. The follow up questionnaire assessed knowledge, attitudes and number of insertions attempted in general practice.

Results: 22 of the 24 eligible doctors responded to the post-training questionnaire (92% response rate)None were inserting IUC when they began this training, but 86% had attempted to insert IUC in their own practice in the 12 months following training; range 2-36 insertions, mostly IUS. A variety of infrequent problems were reported. The most commonly reported barriers to IUC insertion in general practice were time pressures, not being cost-effective and shortage of appropriate patients. Many participants felt they were not confident to attempt insertion in nulliparous women.

Conclusions: Encouraging uptake of LARCs is a public health priority in most countries. Easy access to clinicians trained in IUC insertion is an important strategy for achieving this. This study demonstrated that our training model achieves significant IUC insertion behaviour change among doctors but numbers of IUC insertion were not high. Further research on barriers to IUC insertion in general practice after completion of training is needed.
Objective: The purpose of this study was to investigate the confidence and experience of Australian GPs in IUC insertion 12 months after completing an IUC training program at Family Planning, currently the main provider of IUC insertion training in Australia.
                                                                         
Design & Methods:The IUC training process consists of a home-based learning package, including written and video materials and activities to be submitted; a three-hour workshop with a simulation session using models and IUC training devices; followed by individual clinical training with 6-10 IUC insertions under direct supervision. All doctors who undertook IUC insertion training from January to December 2012, all working in general practice, were invited to participate in the study. Participants were sent a follow-up questionnaire 12 months after completing training. The follow up questionnaire assessed knowledge, attitudes and number of insertions attempted in general practice.

Results: 22 of the 24 eligible doctors responded to the post-training questionnaire (92% response rate)None were inserting IUC when they began this training, but 86% had attempted to insert IUC in their own practice in the 12 months following training; range 2-36 insertions, mostly IUS. A variety of infrequent problems were reported. The most commonly reported barriers to IUC insertion in general practice were time pressures, not being cost-effective and shortage of appropriate patients. Many participants felt they were not confident to attempt insertion in nulliparous women.

Conclusions: Encouraging uptake of LARCs is a public health priority in most countries. Easy access to clinicians trained in IUC insertion is an important strategy for achieving this. This study demonstrated that our training model achieves significant IUC insertion behaviour change among doctors but numbers of IUC insertion were not high. Further research on barriers to IUC insertion in general practice after completion of training is needed.
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