Continuation rates of etonogestrel contraceptive implant (Nexplanon®) in a university general practice.
ESC Congress Library. LYONS J. 05/28/14; 50580; A-165 Disclosure(s): This investigator sponsored study is supported financially by Merck Sharp & Dohme LTD
Dr. JULIANNE LYONS
Dr. JULIANNE LYONS
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Abstract
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 1. Objectives


The reliability of subdermal contraceptive implants has been clearly documented. We aimed to evaluate the continuation rates in our practice and the proportion of patients using medication for side effects.


 2. Method


 A prospective survey of 400 women who had an etonogestrel contraceptive implant (Nexplanon®) was initiated in September 2010 in a general practice, which provided services for university students and their dependants. A questionnaire was completed at fitting with telephone follow up at 3, 6 and 12 months.


 3. Results


 400 women were recruited by March 2012 with a median age of 21 years (range 18-40) Contraceptive use prior to implant fitting was: 46% CHC, 15% POP, 14%condoms, 13% subdermal implants and 4% no regular method. Reasons for requesting an implant were: 54% LARC choice, 32% current contraceptive problems, 10% implant due replacement and 3% medical contraindications to other methods.


At 3 months, 362/376 (96%) had the implant, and 14/376 (4%) had it removed. Of those who still had the implant 12% were using medication for side effects: 77% CHC, 14% progestogens and 4% mefenamic acid.


At 6 months 322/355 (91%) had the implant and 33/355 (9%) had it removed. Of those who still had the implant 13% were using medication to control side effects: 71% CHC, 11% progestogens, 11% acne treatments, 2% mefenamic acid, and 2% paracetamol.


At 12 months, 285/353 (81%) had the implant and 68/353(19%) had it removed. Of those who still had the implant 13% were using medication for side effects: 68% CHC, 19% acne treatments, 11% progestogens, and 3% migraine medication.


 4. Conclusions


 The results show high early continuation rates with a slight reduction at 12 months. The majority of women in this study were already using another method of contraception but had chosen to change to the contraceptive implant. Counselling women appropriately and giving the opportunity to discuss and treat any side effects may improve tolerability of this reliable method of contraception. Medication was used predominantly for unscheduled bleeding and acne. Healthcare professionals also had the opportunity to discuss sexual health needs for the small number of women who subsequently chose to have the implant removed.


 

 1. Objectives


The reliability of subdermal contraceptive implants has been clearly documented. We aimed to evaluate the continuation rates in our practice and the proportion of patients using medication for side effects.


 2. Method


 A prospective survey of 400 women who had an etonogestrel contraceptive implant (Nexplanon®) was initiated in September 2010 in a general practice, which provided services for university students and their dependants. A questionnaire was completed at fitting with telephone follow up at 3, 6 and 12 months.


 3. Results


 400 women were recruited by March 2012 with a median age of 21 years (range 18-40) Contraceptive use prior to implant fitting was: 46% CHC, 15% POP, 14%condoms, 13% subdermal implants and 4% no regular method. Reasons for requesting an implant were: 54% LARC choice, 32% current contraceptive problems, 10% implant due replacement and 3% medical contraindications to other methods.


At 3 months, 362/376 (96%) had the implant, and 14/376 (4%) had it removed. Of those who still had the implant 12% were using medication for side effects: 77% CHC, 14% progestogens and 4% mefenamic acid.


At 6 months 322/355 (91%) had the implant and 33/355 (9%) had it removed. Of those who still had the implant 13% were using medication to control side effects: 71% CHC, 11% progestogens, 11% acne treatments, 2% mefenamic acid, and 2% paracetamol.


At 12 months, 285/353 (81%) had the implant and 68/353(19%) had it removed. Of those who still had the implant 13% were using medication for side effects: 68% CHC, 19% acne treatments, 11% progestogens, and 3% migraine medication.


 4. Conclusions


 The results show high early continuation rates with a slight reduction at 12 months. The majority of women in this study were already using another method of contraception but had chosen to change to the contraceptive implant. Counselling women appropriately and giving the opportunity to discuss and treat any side effects may improve tolerability of this reliable method of contraception. Medication was used predominantly for unscheduled bleeding and acne. Healthcare professionals also had the opportunity to discuss sexual health needs for the small number of women who subsequently chose to have the implant removed.


 

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