Playing to learn the variability of the menstrual cycle and to teach natural family planning methods.
ESC Congress Library. Soler F. 05/28/14; 50599; A-184
Mrs. Françoise Soler
Mrs. Françoise Soler
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Abstract
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Objective


Literature speaks of a menstrual cycle of 28 days and places the ovulation on day 14. But reality is more varied. Learning by the participation, by theatre is a good way, because people remember 20% of what they hear, 30% of what they see, 50% of what they see and hear 70% of what they say and 90% of what they have done.


Design, Methods and Material


A group of people (28 persons or more)


Bibs are prepared in red, white, brown or green tissues.  We need 10 red, 15 white and 25 brown or green.


People form a circle sitting down. Every participant represents a day of the cycle. The 5 first people receive a red bib, the 3 following a brown (or green) one, the next 8 a white bib, and the others a brown one. A cycle of 28 days is represented. Red are days of the period, dry days (in brown or green), cervical mucus days are in white and the last days of the cycle with dryness are represented by brown -or green- bib.


To explain the temperature all the people with brown/green bib, after the last white, get up to represent the high level of temperature.


After this ‘ideal’ 28 days cycle, a short cycle is represented. After the red days, the white days start, followed by the brown/green days.


After that, a long cycle is portrayed. 4 Red days, 11 brown/green days, 7 white days followed by the brown/green days.


Then, we look at a cycle ending in pregnancy (20 brown/green after the white days) and all those 20 people are standing up.


Day 7 stands up, it is a day with disturbance (cold, drinking alcohol...). Day 8 vacant (this day the thermometer was not used).


If the group is small, each participant represents 3 days: one with their head and two by their raised hands holding a bib.


Results


All the cycles can be represented:


A follicular atresia: white days, but when brown/green return they are “sitting down” (because the absence of ovulation and corpus luteum), there follows a new episode of white days, following brown/green people standing, because this time ovulation occurs.


A deficient corpus luteum (< 10 days of high temperature), a spotting...


 


Conclusion


This play was usefull to teach the variability of a normal menstrual cycle at young people, students of medicine of the University of Granada, Barcelona... health workers (midwifes, nurses...) and interested couples in natural family planning.



Objective


Literature speaks of a menstrual cycle of 28 days and places the ovulation on day 14. But reality is more varied. Learning by the participation, by theatre is a good way, because people remember 20% of what they hear, 30% of what they see, 50% of what they see and hear 70% of what they say and 90% of what they have done.


Design, Methods and Material


A group of people (28 persons or more)


Bibs are prepared in red, white, brown or green tissues.  We need 10 red, 15 white and 25 brown or green.


People form a circle sitting down. Every participant represents a day of the cycle. The 5 first people receive a red bib, the 3 following a brown (or green) one, the next 8 a white bib, and the others a brown one. A cycle of 28 days is represented. Red are days of the period, dry days (in brown or green), cervical mucus days are in white and the last days of the cycle with dryness are represented by brown -or green- bib.


To explain the temperature all the people with brown/green bib, after the last white, get up to represent the high level of temperature.


After this ‘ideal’ 28 days cycle, a short cycle is represented. After the red days, the white days start, followed by the brown/green days.


After that, a long cycle is portrayed. 4 Red days, 11 brown/green days, 7 white days followed by the brown/green days.


Then, we look at a cycle ending in pregnancy (20 brown/green after the white days) and all those 20 people are standing up.


Day 7 stands up, it is a day with disturbance (cold, drinking alcohol...). Day 8 vacant (this day the thermometer was not used).


If the group is small, each participant represents 3 days: one with their head and two by their raised hands holding a bib.


Results


All the cycles can be represented:


A follicular atresia: white days, but when brown/green return they are “sitting down” (because the absence of ovulation and corpus luteum), there follows a new episode of white days, following brown/green people standing, because this time ovulation occurs.


A deficient corpus luteum (< 10 days of high temperature), a spotting...


 


Conclusion


This play was usefull to teach the variability of a normal menstrual cycle at young people, students of medicine of the University of Granada, Barcelona... health workers (midwifes, nurses...) and interested couples in natural family planning.


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