Challenges in spreading knowledge about menstrual cycles. Usefulness for reproductive health.
ESC Congress Library. Soler F. 05/28/14; 50600; A-185
Mrs. Françoise Soler
Mrs. Françoise Soler
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Abstract
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Objective


To ascertain if the usual message about fertile window is correct. People who want to achieve a pregnancy or to avoid one receive the message that fertile windows is between days 10 to 19 of the menstrual cycle.


Design & Methods


Investigation about 678 symptothermal charts from 95 women. For every chart we determine the fertile window.


All fertile women have a biphasic pattern of basal body temperature. They can observe an evolution of cervical mucus before the ovulation and changes in the cervix by self palpation. The symptothermal method uses 2 indicators to determine the first day of fertile window (the dryness and a calculation using the shortest cycle) and the last day of fertile window (by the third day of high temperature and the third day past peak of mucus).


Results


The cycles varied from 16 to 95 days, median 29’25 days, SD 6’31. (CI5-95) 24-38


Women observe the change in mucus 6’44 days before peak day, SD 3’45; (1 day, maximum 25), (Ci5-95 2-13)


Median first day of high temperature was day 17 (SD 6’34; 8 to 50; IC5-95 8’90-31), Median high level 12’47 (SD 2’12;  IC5-95 9-16). Those results indicate that all cycles are theoretically fertile.


The fertile phase is 19 to 10 days before the next menstruation, in our study with cycles between 16 to 95 days; the really fertile phase of all the cycle was not “between days 10 to 19 of the menstrual cycle”.


Conclusion


For people who seek a pregnancy the knowledge about the really fertile window helps to conceive. The divulgation of this knowledge will decrease the need for consultation with specialists; will reduce the waiting list for service, the cost and number of tests and examinations.


To avoid conception, the knowledge about fertile window and infertile phases of the cycle, is another and effective option of contraception, often forgotten.



Objective


To ascertain if the usual message about fertile window is correct. People who want to achieve a pregnancy or to avoid one receive the message that fertile windows is between days 10 to 19 of the menstrual cycle.


Design & Methods


Investigation about 678 symptothermal charts from 95 women. For every chart we determine the fertile window.


All fertile women have a biphasic pattern of basal body temperature. They can observe an evolution of cervical mucus before the ovulation and changes in the cervix by self palpation. The symptothermal method uses 2 indicators to determine the first day of fertile window (the dryness and a calculation using the shortest cycle) and the last day of fertile window (by the third day of high temperature and the third day past peak of mucus).


Results


The cycles varied from 16 to 95 days, median 29’25 days, SD 6’31. (CI5-95) 24-38


Women observe the change in mucus 6’44 days before peak day, SD 3’45; (1 day, maximum 25), (Ci5-95 2-13)


Median first day of high temperature was day 17 (SD 6’34; 8 to 50; IC5-95 8’90-31), Median high level 12’47 (SD 2’12;  IC5-95 9-16). Those results indicate that all cycles are theoretically fertile.


The fertile phase is 19 to 10 days before the next menstruation, in our study with cycles between 16 to 95 days; the really fertile phase of all the cycle was not “between days 10 to 19 of the menstrual cycle”.


Conclusion


For people who seek a pregnancy the knowledge about the really fertile window helps to conceive. The divulgation of this knowledge will decrease the need for consultation with specialists; will reduce the waiting list for service, the cost and number of tests and examinations.


To avoid conception, the knowledge about fertile window and infertile phases of the cycle, is another and effective option of contraception, often forgotten.


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