Contraceptive camps as a means for Ugandan health workers to gain practical experience in delivering family planning and cervical cancer screening
ESC Congress Library. Briggs R. 05/10/18; 208068; ESC21
Rosalind Briggs
Rosalind Briggs
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Abstract
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Background: The consequences of a high fertility rate and poor uptake of family planning remain a huge challenge for much of sub-Saharan Africa, especially Uganda. Family planning is key to tackling such consequences and central to enabling women to engage with family planning is ensuring that contraceptive services are available for those who want it. Uganda Sexual Health and Pastoral Education (USHAPE) is an initiative established by the UK Royal College of General Practitioners in Southwest Uganda. USHAPE aims to educate health care workers in hospitals through interactive training to equip them with knowledge and practical skills in contraceptive and cervical cancer screening services.   Objective: The aim was to link theoretical teaching in family planning and cervical cancer screening to the development of practical skills required to deliver such services in the long-term. Shorter-term aims included increasing uptake of family planning and cervical cancer screening services in the local population.   Method: A group of health care workers in a medium sized hospital in were invited to take part in a week-long family planning training course. The course included theoretical teaching about all methods of family planning and teaching of practical skills such as sub-dermal implant and intra-uterine device insertion using models, as well as teaching about cervical cancer screening. Following this initial training, health workers engaged in intensive practical training during a five day camp, where cervical cancer screening and family planning services were advertised and offered free of charge. Over this period trainees were supervised and supported to develop their skills and confidence in delivery of these services. If they met targets agreed with the hospital they qualified for a letter of competence in each skill.   Results: A total of 186 female patients attended for family planning and cervical cancer screening services during the camp. During this time, 32 patients attended for family planning services only, 82 attended for cervical cancer screening only and 66 patients attended for both services. A further 6 patients attended for discussion about sexual health concerns. In addition to other methods, trainees inserted 44 contraceptive implants, with 7 achieving a certificate of competence and a further 3 requiring a small number to achieve this.   Conclusion: Combining free services for patients with training of healthcare workers provides an effective platform for both meeting immediate needs of the population and working towards reducing unmet need in the longer term through increased skill of staff.
Background: The consequences of a high fertility rate and poor uptake of family planning remain a huge challenge for much of sub-Saharan Africa, especially Uganda. Family planning is key to tackling such consequences and central to enabling women to engage with family planning is ensuring that contraceptive services are available for those who want it. Uganda Sexual Health and Pastoral Education (USHAPE) is an initiative established by the UK Royal College of General Practitioners in Southwest Uganda. USHAPE aims to educate health care workers in hospitals through interactive training to equip them with knowledge and practical skills in contraceptive and cervical cancer screening services.   Objective: The aim was to link theoretical teaching in family planning and cervical cancer screening to the development of practical skills required to deliver such services in the long-term. Shorter-term aims included increasing uptake of family planning and cervical cancer screening services in the local population.   Method: A group of health care workers in a medium sized hospital in were invited to take part in a week-long family planning training course. The course included theoretical teaching about all methods of family planning and teaching of practical skills such as sub-dermal implant and intra-uterine device insertion using models, as well as teaching about cervical cancer screening. Following this initial training, health workers engaged in intensive practical training during a five day camp, where cervical cancer screening and family planning services were advertised and offered free of charge. Over this period trainees were supervised and supported to develop their skills and confidence in delivery of these services. If they met targets agreed with the hospital they qualified for a letter of competence in each skill.   Results: A total of 186 female patients attended for family planning and cervical cancer screening services during the camp. During this time, 32 patients attended for family planning services only, 82 attended for cervical cancer screening only and 66 patients attended for both services. A further 6 patients attended for discussion about sexual health concerns. In addition to other methods, trainees inserted 44 contraceptive implants, with 7 achieving a certificate of competence and a further 3 requiring a small number to achieve this.   Conclusion: Combining free services for patients with training of healthcare workers provides an effective platform for both meeting immediate needs of the population and working towards reducing unmet need in the longer term through increased skill of staff.
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